Project Profile: Honeybee Wraps

Early this year RPCo. was tasked with producing a print packaging solution for exciting eco-friendly packaging product, Honeybee Wraps. With environmental sustainability at the core of the Australian-based client’s ethos, our team helped to move manufacturing from Sri Lanka to back on home shores. Business development manager, Cameron Woodbury explains…

What was Honeybee’s brief to the RPCo. team?
Honeybee Wraps was launching a new product range that would be sold in Woolworths stores throughout NSW.

Production of its existing packaging was offshore (Sri Lanka) but the client wanted to find an Australian manufacturing partner that could provide a cost efficient and reliable manufacturing process.

Its existing manufacturing process required eight to 12 weeks, from order to delivery.

Environmental sustainability is a core belief of the Honeybee Wraps team, so any offering had to reflect this.

What was your deadline turnaround?
We had four to six weeks to turn the project around.

What print production method did you recommend?
Due to the quantity requirement, offset production was the only way to proceed.

Environmental sustainability was one of the most important aspects of my discussions with Honeybee Wraps owner Sherrie Adams so we made sure that all inks used were soy and vegetable based, and that the glue used for carton assembly was vegetable based too.

What was the highlight of working with Honeybee?
Working with a small Australian family-owned business that is on a growth trajectory to improve its market share and bring a new product to market.

We were also introduced to cutting-edge market technologies in the environmental sustainability space. We are now investigating how to implement these into our future orders.

How did RPCo. assist in providing a truly Australian made product?
By working alongside an Australian print manufacturer (RPCo.) Honeybee Wraps was able to ensure that another aspect of its product offering was produced in Australia.

How did you manage to successfully reshore Honeybee’s print production?
Despite Australian production being more expensive than offshore manufacturing, the combination of shorter production times, greater production control, improved environmental impact, in conjunction with encouraging local manufacturing, we were able to surpass the cost barriers.

If you would like to know more about this project or discuss your own project needs – please feel free to contact Cameron.

Made In Australia: Local Print Decreases Risks

Made In Australia: Local print increases sustainability and de-risks the supply chain

The past 12 months have been tumultuous for businesses and individuals alike, from the 2019-20 bushfire season to the worldwide disruption caused by the COVID-19 global pandemic. Through efforts like Buy from the Bush, many Australian consumers are seeking to support the local economy and turning their purchasing decisions towards Australian Made products and services. Local print and packaging manufactures have benefited from the surge in demand for locally sourced options, with clients motivated to take back control of their production processes.

According to Rawson Print Co. (RPCo.) director Lachlan Finch, the major benefits of printing in Australia include: greater quality control, improved speed to market and elevated production visibility, along with an absence of the risks inherent when dealing with international embargoes, such as those imposed by China.

“Partnering with a local print and packaging manufacturer enables companies to unlock greater value. The modern printer is a value-oriented service provider; cost is just one piece of the puzzle, we need to be agile, flexible and simultaneously operate as brand guardians who see beyond the ink on a sheet,” says Finch.

“Once all factors such as freight, production, logistics and communication issues are combined, we have proven time and again that local production is not only more reliable and environmentally sound, but can also be more cost effective to ‘cheap’ offshore production.”

One of the largest publicly listed companies in Australia, Domino’s, has thrown its support behind local printing by embracing the ‘Proudly Printed in Australia’ logo for all of its print collateral, and has commenced using it on millions of print pieces.

In a recent article featured in Print 21, Domino’s Chief Marketing Officer ANZ Allan Collins said the pizza giant supported ‘Proudly Printed in Australia’ because of its belief in local manufacturing. The decision was made as Domino’s sought new ways of reducing its carbon footprint and resource consumption, seeking sustainability while also supporting local manufacturing.

Not only a benefit for the environment, printing in Australia is arguably also better for business, reducing costs for local clients and franchisees.

With international travel bans and enforced border lockdowns unlikely to ease anytime soon, Finch at RPCo. says good business and local production go hand in hand; an opinion also shared by Andrew Macaulay, the Chief Executive of the printing industry’s peak body, the Print & Visual Communication Association.

In an article by Australian Manufacturing, Macaulay asserts that COVID-19 has exposed the vulnerability of international supply chains, prompting many companies to return their print production to Australia: ‘With COVID-19, we’re seeing an attack on the Australian economy and the realisation that our supply chains are high-risk, because we’ve moved so much manufacturing overseas.’

The Print & Visual Communication Association has been running a ‘Buy Australian Print’ campaign for some time, which Macaulay reports has had resonance with Australians recognising the real value in domestically produced material.

Research from Australia Post lends further evidence to the idea that Australian consumers have a desire to support local.

In a recent Omnibus survey by the government postal service, 30 per cent of respondents stated they’re making an effort to buy more Australian-made products than they did previously, while 23pc of shoppers said they’re more conscious about buying from businesses in their local areas.

Furthermore, when companies work with an Australian-based printer, they are also supporting a network of related local jobs, such as designers, typographers and boutique creative agencies.

Finch concludes: “Along with the many benefits to clients, in these uncertain times printing locally provides a much-needed, positive flow-on effect to the local creative community. It’s a community that we are very proud to support.”

Seven Tips to Source Your Partner In Print

Seven Tips to Source Your Partner In Print

When first impressions count, an exceptional print production company is a powerful ally in helping to make your product or service stand out from the crowd. When searching for a printer, here are some of Rawson Print Co.’s most important tips to consider for your business.

Do your homework… With a high level of competition in commercial printing services, the more research you do about the production capabilities of your printer and the standard of quality that they are proven to produce, the more likely you are to achieve a partnership aligned with your own expectations for your product.

An obvious but sometimes overlooked focus of your research should be on the production portfolio and customer service history of your printer. Potential clients can request the commercial printer’s portfolio and this will provide a good overview of the printer’s capabilities, while looking at existing physical samples in the market will provide a tangible indication of the quality you can expect.

Make sure you are working with a subject matter expert who specialises in your specific needs.

Are they really listening? An essential consideration is the level of client support and engagement your printer is able to offer once the reassuring sales pitch has concluded. Do they have an informed understanding of your business and your priorities?

Consistent, clear and reciprocal communication with your printing partner is key to maintaining quality control. When job specifications change at short notice, an established and responsive relationship is crucial.

Some printing services may be unable to offer the detailed level of support that your business requires, meaning this should be a key factor in making your decision.

Can they help bang the drum? As part of their consultancy, many printers can offer advice on designing your product to optimise market penetration. While this can be as basic as advising on layout, text and colour, some printing services feature an in-house marketing department to discuss and develop your publicity targets. Many printers will also have existing relationships with trusted graphic design services and can provide valuable recommendations.

Are they the person you want beside you in a crisis? Acknowledging that the luxury of lead-time is not always a reality, it is extremely important to have confidence in your printer’s ability to meet evolving requirements. Do they have the capacity to deliver in an emergency?

What turnaround times can they guarantee for proofs already on file, or for designs not yet in the system? While they may be able to deliver a consistent level of quality and speed of delivery for scheduled work, how effectively can they respond to the unanticipated scenarios inherent to your business needs?

Are you working directly with the manufacturer? Quite often customers think they are dealing directly with the manufacturer, only to find out that their product has been subcontracted to another company, or worst still, sent offshore to another country. Dealing directly with a company who actually produces the product ensures you have much better control over quality control and delivery times, and communication is not lost in translation.    

Are they the right flexible friend? As important as flexibility of turnaround time is the ability of your printer to adapt to both the changing market environment and to the evolving requirements of your brief. A key assessment to make of any printing service is can they offer the flexibility required for you to meet changing conditions, such as a reduced budget?

Do they have the supplier relationships that could possibly negotiate alternative and more affordable print stock? Do they have storage available for back-up inventory with overprinting or pick, pack and distribution services? Can they deliver a cheaper product, an expanded run, or a product customised to a specific audience or promotion while still maintaining an acceptable level of brand consistency?

Depending on the job at hand, your decision on which printer to partner with can often come down to the project itself. For example, a long run catalogue printer is certainly not the right choice for your bespoke property book, or asking an instant printer to manage the production of your packaging cartons may not achieve the results you were looking for? Once again, invest some time into reviewing their previous projects.

Long-term relationship material? Variables such as colours, materials, finishing and pricing can all be negotiated. However, the relationship you have with your printing services provider should reflect the fact that they are essentially a key business partner.

The tone of engagement should be a mutual investment in communication, one defined by a level of care and attention that is unique to your business needs. The more collaborative and dynamic the service your printer can offer, the more effective your creative partnership will be.

Circular Economy – The New Normal

Print and packaging are leading the charge for customer centric sustainability

For almost a decade, major global corporations have been shifting their business models, re-evaluating their strategies and asking more questions about where they source their materials. COVID-19 has revved this conversation up and the printing industry has once again stepped up to drive sustainable customer centric solutions.

“2020 could not be a better time to adopt this thinking. Print has always been fundamentally based around sustainability and the principles of a circular economy” says Lachlan Finch, Director, Rawson Print Company (RPCo.).

So, what is a circular economy and what does it look like? The premise rests on sustainability, an ethos that is likely to become more prevalent as we transition into what has been coined ‘The Great Economic Reset’ – thanks to the challenges of COVID-19.

Traditional perspectives that the printing industry is environmentally unsustainable are far from the truth. In fact, at its essence, printing is circular: trees are planted and harvested for paper, processed into an end product, distributed, recycled, biodegraded back into the ground – with replacement trees planted in an ongoing, cyclical process.

Adds Finch: “Clients want to feel empowered by the impact of their purchasing decisions, that’s why it’s more important than ever for print and packaging manufactures to not only provide environmentally sustainable solutions, which they have done for decades, but to also communicate these environmental credentials through the use of visual icons such as recycled and FSC logos and labelling. It is incumbent on us to demonstrate our effectiveness in the circular economy so consumers can be vindicated in their choices.”

According to Two Sides (a not-for-profit global initiative promoting the unique sustainable attributes of print and paper), well-managed forests planted for the printing industry actually reduce the pressure placed on natural forests and can provide many other environmental benefits.

This year, the not-for-profit completed a European survey of 5,900 consumers, commissioned by research company Toluna. The report shared key findings that identify paper and cardboard ranking highest with consumers for sustainability attributes, including home compostable (72pc), better for the environment (62pc) and easier to recycle (57pc).

In May 2020, The Conversation ran an article citing the European Commission’s vow to build a sustainable circular economy post-pandemic: ‘A sustainable circular economy involves designing and promoting products that last and that can be re-used, repaired and remanufactured’.

This sentiment is shared by the Australian print industry, increasingly driven by a focus on reducing their carbon footprint while delivering an attractive product. Similar to print,  packaging manufacturers are focused on their impact in the circular future. Examples of the drive for sustainable solutions are near boundless: from Coca-Cola’s transition from plastic wrapping to a fully recycleable paperboard topper for its multipacks, saving 3,000 tonnes of CO2 annually1, to the implementing of cellulose films for carton windowing and company such as Nestlé pleading to to make 100 percent of ALL its product’s packaging recyclable or reusable by 20252.

It’s heartening to see businesses proactively seeking out new ways of working. As businesses shift their thinking to align with broader social and environmental issues, the problems caused by our material world become glaringly obvious to consumers. As businesses question conventional practices, innovation will manifest through sustainability and circular economy initiatives.

Knowledge of the day-to-day impacts of irresponsible manufacturing and consumption, and of the potential benefits offered by the circular economy movement, is gaining traction, and fast. As printers, we must play our part. RPCo. prioritises sustainability because we believe we should be accountable to our clients, our customers and to the environment. You can find out more about our sustainability practices here.

  1. Packaging Europe – Coca-Cola announces sustainable paperboard topper for multi-pack cans. See full article
  2. Reader’s Digest – 22 Big Companies That Are Getting Rid of Plastic for Good. See full article

RPCo.’s role in Anti-Counterfeiting

How the printing sector is playing a key contributing role in the Anti-Counterfeiting Industry

In 2018, AP News reported that by 2017 the cost of global counterfeiting reached $USD1.2 trillion. It went on to forecast growth to hit $USD1.82 trillion this year. It follows that according to Global Newswire, the world’s anti-counterfeiting packaging market is set to reach $USD105.86 billion during 2020-2024. These are staggering numbers.

Bringing the issue back home, in 2019 the Sydney Morning Herald reported that Australian companies are in the top 20 of those most commonly affected and the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) estimated exports sent to other markets in the period 2016-2019, increased by 8 per cent.

The stats paint a fairly bleak picture, making clear the seriousness of the issue and the need for all businesses who are involved in the supply chain to make a difference where they can. We believe this calls for a proactive response from the printing industry, domestically.

Deciding to be part of the anti-counterfeiting solution

The variety of solutions and the anti-counterfeiting technology available to brands is impressive. For Rawson Packaging Co. (RPCo.) it’s been an interesting journey so far. We are strategically integrating our own anti-counterfeiting technology thereby providing another realm of value add for clients who’ve come to us for their printing and packaging needs. Both digital and offset solutions are available and we’re excited that in the longer term we will be able to assist a range of clients in this specialist area.

“The variety of solutions and the anti-counterfeiting technology available to brands is impressive. For Rawson Packaging Co. (RPCo.) it’s been an interesting journey so far.” – Lani Draheim account manager Rawson Print Company.

If our current live packaging and print projects with an anti-counterfeiting component are anything to go by, this problem isn’t going away too soon. A large proportion of enquiries are from Australian brands that are experiencing counterfeiting challenges on the ground in China. This points to the very real concerns that Australian brands are facing offshore alongside their global brand counterparts whose own issues tend to be the ones we hear about in the news.

Counterfeiting affects almost every sector

As anti-counterfeiting measures become more sophisticated, so too do the counterfeiting operations –  and there’s no market that’s immune. From the most popularly copied products – electrical goods, fragrances, cosmetics and sneakers – to fake batteries, telephone accessories, sunglasses, toothbrushes and personal care products. More and more brands are realising this isn’t a problem exclusive to the luxury market as mainstream perceptions would have you believe.

Technology is helping us win the battle

The good news is the technology has evolved to by-pass even the most astute of the counterfeiting offenders. Invisible UV pigments combined with undisclosed short runs is one strategy that builds staged, anti-counterfeiting lines of defence, protecting products and brands.

Near Field Communication (NFC) and QR Codes are other well-documented methods that brand owners are using to assist with consumer authentication and in the long run, these methods lead to a building of consumer trust in their chosen brand. RPCo. is set up to offer NFC technology to clients, a process that involves placing individual stickers on the inside of each carton, thereby making each unique.

The QR code launched in 1994 for the Japanese automotive industry. We then spent years asking what their use was. Well, the anti-counterfeiting industry has this one wrapped up! QR Codes now work with Secure Graphics, a technology which is embedded into a digital image of a QR code, making it secure against copying/counterfeit.

A great example of the use of another anti-counterfeiting solution is microchip technology. Australian wine brand, Seppeltsfield, from the Barossa launched its Grounds range in 2019 in collaboration with a protection and consumer engagement company, YPB Group Ltd. Each wine label has the technology embedded into the wine bottle label and authentication is delivered to the consumer via an app.

The Australian print industry has seen vast quality improvements over the last two decades making it a lot less difficult for counterfeiters to bluff consumers. This undoubtedly presents an opportunity for the industry to supply and integrate technology into products locally. However, for everyday consumer goods, it’s not economically viable for many brands to afford the price of silicon-based electronics, therefore creating a swell of demand for lower-cost anti-counterfeiting technology.

There’s a raft of innovative ideas and products being brought to market. Holograms are another great example of this and are becoming increasingly more widespread in the manufacturing sector. 3D Verification, Serialisation ID technology and thin film technology applicable to packaging, labelling, plastic and metal products are all anti-counterfeiting solutions that brands are using. In all of these, printing capabilities are required.

We work together with our clients to tailor their own personalised anti-counterfeit solutions to suit their product range and brand. There is not one solution that suits all, so we assist in helping clients to find the right anti-counterfeit measures to ensure brand protection.

If you think your brand and print packaging might be susceptible to counterfeiters it’s worth having a conversation. We welcome your enquiry.

100% of packaging to be reusable by 2025

Compostability is a complex subject in the plastics debate. Recognising the difference between ‘certified compostable’ and ‘conventional plastics’ is just the start. It’s also crucial to understand the standards and certifications that apply, as well as potential applications, communication and labelling requirements. 
 

APCO’s ‘Considerations for Compostable Plastic Packaging’ – (developed in partnership with the Australian Organics Recycling Association (AORA) and the Australasian Bioplastics Association (ABA) – is an excellent resource.

It informs brand owners, packaging technologists, designers and food service providers about when and where to use certified compostable plastic packaging as well as helping with understanding the potential applications suited to the current and available infrastructure. 

We’ve pulled out 6 points of interest from the report that are food for thought:
 
  1. In Australia in 2017/18 compostable plastics accounted for 0.02% or 1,000 tonnes of all packaging placed on the market. Today, it is around 0.1% 
  2. For an item to be called ‘compostable’ it must be certified to the Australian Standard applicable to industrial and commercial composting facilities.
  3. Home composting is subject to a different standard called the Australian Home Composting Standard.
  4. All certified compostable plastics will biodegrade, but not all biodegradable plastics will turn into compost. 
  5. The Australian Industrial Composting Standard tests for earthworm survival to verify absence of toxic residues in organic output.   
  6. The Australian Bioplastics Association publishes all applicants who have conformed to the Australian Industrial Composting Standard.
We’d love to hear your thoughts on this topic or if you’d like to chat about how we might be able to help with your next print or packaging project, please be in touch.
 

RPCO’s new Anti-Bacterial product

Antimicrobial Resistance

RPCO is always on the lookout for product innovations. Our latest is a market-first that offers protection against the spread of harmful bacteria for the intended full-life of a product. 

This exciting and independently tested technology has scientifically proven benefits for your customers that in turn enhance product value and drive commercial appeal. The perfect win-win to give you peace of mind! 

Biomaster antimicrobial technology can be applied to any printed sheet and is designed to inhibit the growth of harmful micro-organisms such as bacteria, fungi and moulds. A key advantage is its effectiveness over the intended lifetime of any product.

“Innovation is key to an evolving and progressive commercial printing industry. This partnership brings real benefits for our clients at a time when they need it most.”

We love the myriad of benefits this antimicrobial technology offers. In addition to the above these include:

  • Independently tested to ISO 22196.
  • Inhibits the growth of most types of harmful bacteria including common food-poisoning bacteria on treated surfaces.
  • Completely safe to use in food and water applications.

Laden with gold star safety credentials, this highly effective additive comes with the Biomaster logo, providing your customers with the seal of approval from the global market leader in antimicrobial technology.  Confidence by endorsement at its best.

Here are the top 5 key Biomaster FAQ’s to help with any unanswered questions:

How does Biomaster work? Biomaster binds to the cell wall disrupting growth. The Biomaster ions interfere with enzyme production stopping the cell producing energy. Biomaster interrupts the cell’s DNA preventing replication.

 How effective is Biomaster? Very. Biomaster is proven to inhibit the growth of microbes by up to 99.99%. These include bacteria, fungi and moulds. It’s also been proven to be effective against antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE).

 How long is Biomaster effective for? Biomaster is effective for the intended lifetime of the product to which it is added. It is built-in and doesn’t wear off or leach out. Nor can you see, smell or taste Biomaster. 

Is it safe? Yes. Not only has it been repeatedly tested to ISO standards but it is based on silver ion technology, recognised for centuries with no harmful effects. Biomaster is used in medical, food and water applications. We don’t use nanotechnology due to ongoing safety concerns.

How do I know if a product is Biomaster protected? Unless it carries the Biomaster symbol, you don’t know if it is protected. Ask before you buy it.

The art of making fine print matter

Putting great people and superior technology together means we can accommodate all of your print and packaging requirements. One, or one million pieces – paper or plastic – clients choose us because they know that we know, that fine print matters.

Take a tour of our factory and watch our people in action using the HP Indigo 10,000, the 2019 Heidelberg CX102 Offset Press and Aqueous Coater, the PUR Book Binder, the Saddle Stitch Booklet Maker, the Digital Stitcher, the Universal Folder-Gluer and the high speed Flat Bed Die-Cutter and Creaser.

Skill, passion and technology go a long way at RPCo …because fine print matters.

RPCO’s HP Indigo 10,000 – Meet Todd

Rawson Print Co have been delighted with the inclusion of the HP Indigo 10,000 into their suite of machinery. The Indigo 10,000 will provide clients with fast and flexible printing on sheet sizes up to B2. If you want to get personal, you will be amazed by the cost-efficient personalisation this machine offers. Speaking of personal, meet Todd – Chief Operator of our HP Indigo 10,000. Todd will ensure your print campaign delivers amazing results for you and your customers.

 

Q: Hi Todd, what’s your claim to fame?
A: I was the first person to be trained in Sydney on the HP Indigo 10,000!

Q: What’s your favourite colour?
A: Red

Q: What’s your favourite paper stock?
A: Knight Smooth

Q: Best job to go through the HP Indigo 10,000 and why?
A: Collated PUR book. Once printed the job is trimmed, we attach the cover then the job is finished. So much easier and quicker than traditional offset printing

Q: How do you think the HP Indigo 10,000 has changed printing?
A: Quick turn arounds allow us to meet tight deadlines and customer needs.

Q: What aspects of printing are you still fascinated by?
A: Seeing the end product of a finished job after going through the whole process

Q: What’s your passion away from printing?
A: Playing golf

Q: What can’t you say no to?
A: My daughter

Q: What three words would your friends use to describe you?
A: reliable, loyal, funny

 

RPCO Multiple Award Winners at 2019 NSW Printing Industry Creativity Awards (PICA)

The team at Rawson Print Co. were ecstatic to receive six Gold, two Silver and three Bronze medals at the 2019 NSW PICAs – an amazing recognition by the Printing Industry. The event was attended by 150 printers, with all Gold winners qualifying for entry into the National Print Awards to be held in August 2019. 

Winning 11 awards, across various categories, makes this the best year yet for Rawson Print Co. (at the NSW PICAs). This achievement would not have been possible without the incredible team at RPCo and our amazing clients. The partnerships created with our clients has allowed us to push boundaries and explore new techniques to develop beautifully crafted print and packaging solutions. 

Congratulations to our valued clients and thank you for your continued support!

GOLD

QT Perth Suite
Category: Multi-Piece Productions and Campaigns
Client: Event Hospitality and Entertainment

QT Perth Suite
Category: Branding and Identity – Corporate, retail hospitality and fashion
Client: Event Hospitality and Entertainment

Tasti Smooshed Protein Balls Sampler Box
Category: Packaging
Client: Rocket Comms and Tasti Products NZ

Seventy One Singer Sewn Book
Category: Book Printing (Wiro/Spiral/Side Sewn/Interscrews)
Client: Horizon Print Management

ICC Sydney Art Collection Book
Category: Book Printing (Offset/Bound/Perfect/Notch/PUR/Section Sewn)
Client: Coleface Print

Platinum on Peach Tree Book
Category: Booklets/Catalogues/Magazines (Offset)
Client: Edward James / The James Agency

SILVER

One Barangaroo
Category: Book Printing (Offset/Case Bound)
Client: Wordsearch

Newmarket Property Book
Category: Embellishment
Client: The Property Agency

BRONZE

Woolooware Bay Retail Book
Category: Book Printing (Digital/Case Bound)
Client: Rare ID

Eclipse Tower Book
Category: Booklets/Catalogues/Magazines (Digital)
Client: Wordsearch

ABC Annual Report – Volume I + II
Category: Annual Report/Prospectus and Yearbooks
Client: ABC